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HIV Project Conakry

MSF Medical Coordinator Dr Letizia Di Stefano in Conakry, Guinea on March 19, 2016. MSF launched a HIV testing campaign in Conakry with the support of health authorities moving throughout several neighbourhoods throughout 2016.

"I think that the community has responded well to our activities and see the importance of engaging in the fight against AIDS. In Guinea a large majority of the activities of screening are for sick patients, who arrive already with the symptoms. The campaign’s objective is to identify as early as possible (HIV) so they don’t fall sick. There is a clear objective on the international level to eradicate the infection HIV. That requires a rapid intervention in all the countries. To add, it’s important not to forget that during the ebola epidemic all of the health systems in Guinea were affected so on a practical level we did not have voluntary HIV screening during all of the period of ebola. When we speak of the prevalence in Guinea (of HIV), we are looking at a low prevalence of 2%, at the same time this is four times the global level of HIV so we can’t forgot to cover the needs of this population if Guinea is going to make progress."

Despite countries in West and Central Africa having a relatively low HIV prevalence (

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MSF Medical Coordinator Dr Letizia Di Stefano in Conakry, Guinea on March 19, 2016. MSF launched a HIV testing campaign in Conakry with the support of health authorities moving throughout several neighbourhoods throughout 2016.<br />
<br />
"I think that the community has responded well to our activities and see the importance of engaging in the fight against AIDS. In Guinea a large majority of the activities of screening are for sick patients, who arrive already with the symptoms. The campaign’s objective is to identify as early as possible (HIV) so they don’t fall sick. There is a clear objective on the international level to eradicate the infection HIV. That requires a rapid intervention in all the countries. To add, it’s important not to forget that during the ebola epidemic all of the health systems in Guinea were affected so on a practical level we did not have voluntary HIV screening during all of the period of ebola. When we speak of the prevalence in Guinea (of HIV), we are looking at a low prevalence of 2%, at the same time this is four times the global level of HIV so we can’t forgot to cover the needs of this population if Guinea is going to make progress."<br />
<br />
Despite countries in West and Central Africa having a relatively low HIV prevalence (